Airplane near mid-air collision (NMAC) at 33,000 ft – Were you on this flight?

This near mid-air near collision (NMAC) occurred Monday, 13th, March 2017 on a flight AB7623 from PMI to DUS at 16:04 hrs over Germany. The distance was only 200-300 meters and less then 100 meters in altitude.

According the the FAA:

A near midair collision is defined as an incident associated with the operation of an aircraft in which a possibility of collision occurs as a result of proximity of less than 500 feet to another aircraft, or a report is received from a pilot or a flight crew member stating that a collision hazard existed between two or more aircraft.

The Atlantic wrote recently under the Headline

How Airlines Decide What Counts as a Near Miss

Like spy-agency analysts scrutinizing a constant river of messages, airline and FAA safety experts work to head off disasters by searching for trends in these incident reports. By any index, the system has saved lives and money; the most recent commercial-aviation fatalities occurred in 2009, when a regional jet crashed outside of Buffalo, New York, and in 2013, when a Korean airline jet crashed at San Francisco International Airport.** But recently, ground-level safety incidents at U.S. airports have been on the rise: As the Wall Street Journal reported this week, hazardous “runway incursions” jumped 25 percent this fiscal year, increasing for a third year in a row.There are questions about whether the FAA and airlines are learning all they can. Predictive safety depends on faithful reporting of these incidents, which the FAA defines, in essence, as unexpected mishaps: incidents that could affect safe operations and that involve no serious injury or substantial aircraft damage. Yet there’s no clear line between what does and doesn’t meet this definition. Publicly, only abbreviated summaries are posted for most incidents, and others get longer accounts scrubbed of some details.Much of what happens in the skies and on the runways, therefore, stays in the skies and on the runways. The safety of flying depends in part on how much data the aviation industry decides to collect—and on what mishaps it determines are truly dangerous.

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